A Letter From Sophie

I wanted to share this recent update from my sister Sophie, who moved to Ethiopia this summer to do medical missions work. Last spring on this blog many of you contributed money toward the work Sophie is doing there in Ethiopia. Sophie brought the money with her to Ethiopia, thinking she’d know more about how to spend that money once she’d been there awhile. Here’s what she came up with. I think you guys will like it!

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FROM SOPHIE:

Hi there!
I was talking to Dr. Mary when we were driving home from clinic the other day about money. She had just placed her medication order for the year, and was blown away by how expensive things were. She had to greatly reduce her supply of several meds, including those for tuberculosis. I was trying to think of how I could help, and remembered the money that was raised in the fundraiser on your blog.

I offered to help with medications, and we talked about the logistics of that. Then she gave me the option of running and funding the feeding program. I loved that idea, so decided that I would do it. So, starting in a few weeks, I’ll be the one making the special granola and purchasing the corn that Mary provides for those on her feeding program at our Thursday clinic.

Adults can get on the feeding program if they are desperately poor, and that poverty is validated by their malnourished appearance, and by the confirmation of others in the community. Infants are also a part of this program. Currently, we have 3 sets of twin babies that are “fed.” The high-protein granola is given to the infant’s breastfeeding mother so that she can produce enough milk to feed them. In order to get a refill (every other week), the babies are weighed to ensure that they are getting the benefit of the food.

Two of the twins currently on the program are now 4 months old, and the fattest little Ethiopian babies I have ever seen! It’s always so fun to weigh them because their mom is so proud, and the babies are so smiley and adorable. Mary says that when they started 3 months ago, mom was completely emaciated, and the babies were not looking any better. She gave the mom the granola, and the next week, she looked less emaciated, and the babies were vigorous and bright-eyed–they were a whole different family because of their little tin of granola!

I am so excited to be in charge of this simple but life-changing program. And because of your contributions, you are a part of it too! I will take some pictures of the kiddos that this program feeds in the next few weeks so you can see the lives that you are changing. Thank you so much for being so generous, and God bless you!

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{ 6 Comments }

  1. thanks for sharing …………

  2. Kudos to you for your involvement in the fund raising campaign and to your sister for her work in working directly with the ill. Sadly, so many people around the world suffer the effects of treatable tuberculosis simply because of poverty and malnutrition. Good luck on your activities.

  3. THIS is awesome!!

    how can we still give?

  4. Hi Mary,

    I am a regular reader of Sophie’s blog. It’s amazing all that she’s doing there and that baby is beyond precious!!

    The work she’s doing there must be a great blessing to the people she’s helping.

Trackbacks

  1. […] and not wean and give her baby f*ormula. I remembered that information as I started to read a post by Mary at Owlhaven.net on her sister Sophie’s medical mission in Ethiopia (you can read my review of Mary’s book A Sane Woman’s Guide to Raising a Large Family […]

  2. […] and not wean and give her baby f*ormula. I remembered that information as I started to read a post by Mary at Owlhaven.net on her sister Sophie’s medical mission in Ethiopia (you can read my review of Mary’s book A Sane Woman’s Guide to Raising a Large Family […]